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Curculioninae Books LLC

Curculioninae

Books LLC

Published May 29th 2010
ISBN : 9781157303985
Paperback
30 pages
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 About the Book 

Chapters: Boll Weevil, Anthonomus, Anthonomus Pomorum, Cossonus, Curculio Nucum, Anthonomus Signatus, Curculio Glandium, Peristoreus. Source: Wikipedia. Pages: 28. Not illustrated. Free updates online. Purchase includes a free trial membership in theMoreChapters: Boll Weevil, Anthonomus, Anthonomus Pomorum, Cossonus, Curculio Nucum, Anthonomus Signatus, Curculio Glandium, Peristoreus. Source: Wikipedia. Pages: 28. Not illustrated. Free updates online. Purchase includes a free trial membership in the publishers book club where you can select from more than a million books without charge. Excerpt: The boll weevil (Anthonomus grandis) is a beetle measuring an average length of six millimeters, which feeds on cotton buds and flowers. Thought to be native to Central America, it migrated into the United States from Mexico in the late 19th century and had infested all U.S. cotton-growing areas by the 1920s, devastating the industry and the people working in the American south. During the late 20th century it became a serious pest in South America as well. Since 1978, the Boll Weevil Eradication Program in the U.S. has allowed full-scale cultivation to resume in many regions. Adult weevils overwinter in well-drained areas in or near cotton fields after diapause. They emerge and enter cotton fields from early spring through midsummer, with peak emergence in late spring, and feed on immature cotton bolls. The female lays about 200 eggs over a 10-12 day period. The oviposition leaves wounds on the exterior of the flower bud. The eggs hatch in three to five days. The larvae feed within the cotton squares for eight to ten days, then pupate. The pupal stage lasts five to seven days. The life cycle from egg to adult spans about three weeks during the summer. Under optimal conditions there may be eight to 10 generations per season. According to the book From Can See to Cant by Thad Sitton and Dan Utley, Under ideal conditions for reproduction--which fortunately seldom existed--the progeny of a single pair of weevils emerging in the spring could reach something like 134 million before the coming of frost. Boll weevils will begin to die at temperatures at or below 23 degrees Fahrenheit...More: http: //booksllc.net/?id=17082